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Snow Removal & Snow Plowing Service

Premium snow management by Ultra-Lawn means that your family members, employees, customers, and residents arrive safe and sound. We clear the way for you to enjoy your property at home or conduct business while others are still digging themselves out. North Idaho Snow...

DIY: How to prevent a Sprinkler Blowout

Photo by FOX from Pexels If you’ve lived in Northern Idaho for a while, then you’ve probably experienced a sprinkler blowout due to the freezing temperatures in Winter. And for the majority of homeowners with lawns, this means work. Winterizing your irrigation system...

2019 Fall Cleanup Checklist

Photo by Valeriia Miller from Pexels When Fall comes around, we typically think of golden colored trees and visits to the local pumpkin patch. However, it also means it’s time to get your yard ready for winter. Doing some Fall cleanup will save you time and energy...

To Mulch or Not to Mulch?

What is mulch? In the case of mulching lawn mowers, the mulch consists of grass clippings from the mowed grass. The clippings are cut into fine pieces that fall easily to the soil surface. There, they can be rapidly broken down by soil microorganisms, which release...

Best Way to Shovel Driveway this Winter

IMPORTANT NOTICE:  If you are inactive and have a history of heart trouble, talk to your doctor before you take on the task of shoveling snow. 1. The best way to shovel driveway starts by picking the right shovel.  A smaller blade will require you to lift less snow;...

Smartest Snow Shoveling Tips for 2019

It happens every winter in this part of the country… snow falls, usually leaving piles of it to clear from your sidewalks and driveway. Why not think about the following snow shoveling tips before you grab your shovel after a major snowfall: Scooping up heavy...

Smartest Snow Safety Tips for 2019

Winter is a time of year when hazards, both natural and man-made, can place you at risk in a moment of forgetfulness. Even you, the infallible homeowner — queen of the castle, king of the tool belt — may be taking risks of which you’re not even...

Moisture Stress: What Does That Mean for Trees?

With below average precipitation over several seasons, trees across Idaho becoming moisture stressed. Trees vary in their ability to tolerate this stress. In fact, native trees have much more tolerance than planted trees and shrubs. Moisture stressed trees are much...

How To Prevent Snow Mold In Your Lawn

Prevent Snow Mold in Your Lawn As winter is coming to an end, we long to see green grass again.  As the snow melts, you look out at your newly exposed lawn, to find grayish circles all over it. Gray snow mold loves the cold, and grows on your lawn when snow has been...

Snow Removal & Snow Plowing Service

Posted by on Oct 9, 2012 in Snow Clearing, Winterization | Comments Off on Snow Removal & Snow Plowing Service

Premium snow management by Ultra-Lawn means that your family members, employees, customers, and residents arrive safe and sound. We clear the way for you to enjoy your property at home or conduct business while others are still digging themselves out. North Idaho Snow Removal Services: Snow Plowing Service Snow Removal/ Off-Site Removal Loader Work / Bobcat Service De-Icing Snow Shoveling Snow Blowing We are proud to offer our customers: On-Site Consultations Free Estimates Per Push Programs Per Hour Programs Customized Season Contracts Emergency Response Service Ultra Lawn has full-time snow removal professionals that manage your account 24 hours a day, 7 days per week.  Parking areas, access roads, walkways, and entrances get immediate and constant attention. In addition, we do this throughout snow emergencies with our snow removal equipment and manpower. Many companies plow snow as a secondary service to complement their “primary” business. Unfortunately, the customer usually ends up learning the hard way when their lot or walks are not plowed properly. Our clients deserve timely service during snowfalls at any time of day. Ultimately, we make your satisfaction our primary business. We understand that you need a snow plowing service that cares about your property. So, when you’re ready for the extra landscaping attention that you deserve, think Ultra Lawn. Ultra-Lawn specializes in Winter Maintenance Programs tailored towards: Residential Properties Corporate Office Buildings Retail Shopping Centers Industrial Properties Large Parking Areas There is a difference! That is why we are ranked as one of the area’s top snow management Contractors. Ultra Lawn leaves customers happy and lawns looking green for seasons. Be sure to check out our other articles on winterization. Contact us today for a Free, No Obligation...

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DIY: How to prevent a Sprinkler Blowout

Posted by on Nov 6, 2019 in Winterization | Comments Off on DIY: How to prevent a Sprinkler Blowout

Photo by FOX from Pexels If you’ve lived in Northern Idaho for a while, then you’ve probably experienced a sprinkler blowout due to the freezing temperatures in Winter. And for the majority of homeowners with lawns, this means work. Winterizing your irrigation system is very important. If you don’t drain the water from your sprinkler system, then you’ll likely experience a sprinkler blowout. There are two main ways to drain your sprinkler system. You can do what’s called a quick drain or a blow-out. You can always have a landscaping company blow-out your system for a fee. However, be one of the firsts to call since landscapers get busier as temperatures begin to fall. If you’re a DIY person though, then read on for the winterization steps to prevent a sprinkler blowout. You’ll need an air compressor for this first option. Blow out: Turn off the water shut-off valve to your sprinkler line. It stems off from your main water valve. If not, then you may have to shut off the main water valve. 2. Open the outlet drain and close the backflow outlet. If your system isn’t equipped with an outlet drain valve, we recommended you install one. You can drain your system without an outlet drain valve by blowing air through a petcock, which are the usually two little drain valves located on the side of your backflow device. However, blowing air through these small passages can heat up plastic parts inside the backflow device and warp or crack them. 3. Using your air compressor, connect the hose to the threaded outlet drain valve. This is located near your backflow device. Depending on the compressor hose, you might have to buy an adapter to fit onto the drain. 4. When the air compressor shows 80 lbs. per square inch on the gauge, turn the valve to your first zone. Allow the pressure to push water out of the sprinkler heads for as long as it can. Then, move to the second zone and so forth until you’ve blown out all the zones. 5. If your air compressor is small, you may have to blow out each zone more than once. 6. Once you’re done blowing out the sprinkler system, turn all the ball valves and petcocks to a 45-degree position so they are half open and half closed. This allows any remaining water to drain out. 7. Make sure the line to the sprinkler system in the basement is shut off completely and that you open the inlet drain valve in your basement. 8. Finally, unplug your sprinkler timer, remove batteries, and you’re good for the Winter. Quick drain If you don’t have time to blow-out your sprinkler system before the first heavy freeze, here is another alternative: 1. Locate your backflow prevention device and vacuum breaker. This might be found either outside or even in the garage, and it’ll be above ground next to your foundation. 2. Turn off the valve between the backflow prevention device and the main line of your sprinkler system. Then, look for the main shut-off valve to your sprinkler system, turn this off, and open the inlet drain valve (located between the main shut-off valve and the pipe leading outside to your backflow device). 4. Place a bucket under this valve...

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2019 Fall Cleanup Checklist

Posted by on Nov 6, 2019 in Fall Lawn Care Tips | Comments Off on 2019 Fall Cleanup Checklist

Photo by Valeriia Miller from Pexels When Fall comes around, we typically think of golden colored trees and visits to the local pumpkin patch. However, it also means it’s time to get your yard ready for winter. Doing some Fall cleanup will save you time and energy when spring rolls around. Which, in turn, keeps your family safe in the yard year-round. Make sure you get the most out of your yard by following our Fall cleanup checklist must-do’s. 1. Clear out any loose debris. Fallen leaves and overgrown weeds are the perfect place for pests to settle in for the winter. So, begin by clearing out your flower beds to make it less inviting for pests. 2. Till the vegetable garden. After your final harvest, pull out old vegetable plants and till the whole area. You could also start a compost pile to help nurture your soil for planting next Spring. 3. Trim over hanging tree Branches. Trim up any large or out-of-place tree branches that may cause trouble during the winter. If you fail to do this, you take the chance of branches breaking and falling during the snowfall. 4. Clear out the gutters. Contrary to popular belief, not all Fall cleanup is in the yard. Take the time to remove debris from rain gutters. You can check for proper drainage by clearing out any blockages and rinsing with a hose. 5. Dry everything out. Drain all water from fountains and other types of irrigation systems. Water left sitting over the winter may freeze, expand, and damage your equipment. Check out our post on how to drain your sprinkler system to prevent blow-outs. 6. Aerate your yard. Break up soil to keep water from pooling. This will ensure that nutrients can seep down and reach the roots over the winter. A garden fork will do the job for small yards. However, larger yards may require a walk-behind aerator, which should be available to rent for a reasonable price. 7. Feed the lawn. Feed your yard nutrients to help it survive the long, cold Winter. You’ll want to use a lawn fertilizer with high phosphorous content to encourage root growth. This guarantees you enjoy a lush, green lawn come Spring. 8. Rake and mulch. If you let layers of leaves accumulate on your lawn, they can suffocate the grass. Rake them up, shred them, and use them as mulch for young trees, shrubs, and flower beds. You could even skip the raking part if you use a lawn mower to mulch the leaves. 9. Prune trees and shrubs. Trim any dead branches and cut back overgrown trees and bushes. This sets your yard to be ready for new, healthy growth come Spring. 10. Give your yard one last mow. Set your mower to a low setting and give the lawn a close buzz before the Winter. This helps the soil dry out more quickly in the Spring, which results in a lusher lawn. 11. Protect cold-sensitive plants. Keep sensitive perennials, shrubs, and roses in top shape through the cold days of Winter. To do this, add mulch to the base and wrap plants in cloth barriers. This prevents damage from freezing temperatures. Depending on the hardiness of the plan, you can use a single sheet or blanket or...

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To Mulch or Not to Mulch?

Posted by on Apr 22, 2015 in Summer Tips | Comments Off on To Mulch or Not to Mulch?

What is mulch? In the case of mulching lawn mowers, the mulch consists of grass clippings from the mowed grass. The clippings are cut into fine pieces that fall easily to the soil surface. There, they can be rapidly broken down by soil microorganisms, which release nutrients from the mulched plant material back into the soil. Why use Mulch?  Mulching enhances the health and growth of the turf by reducing evaporation of moisture from the lawn and keeping soil temperature cooler. In addition, it has been estimated that mulched clippings, which are 85 percent water and five percent nitrogen, can provide up to 25 percent of fertilizer needs for an average lawn. Mulching keeps grass clippings out of landfills. According to the EPA, yard trimmings make up approximately 13 percent (or 28 million tons) of the national waste stream. Grass clippings account for two thirds of all yard waste. Mulching takes less time than bagging, because you don’t have to stop to empty the bag. If you live in a municipality that charges extra fees to landfill yard waste, mulching will also save you money. How do I Avoid Clumps of Mulch? Clumps are ugly, and when left on the surface of the grass and can damage the plant underneath. Mowing regularly and leaving fewer and smaller clippings is key as smaller clippings fall more rapidly to the soil surface and are less likely to clump. We suggest mowing with a sharp blade on a setting of 2 ½” to 3”. Does mulching promote thatch? Some people may be reluctant to mulch grass clippings because they do not want to promote the buildup of thatch.  Thatch is formed when the roots, stems, leaves and other parts of the grass build up faster than they decompose.  Mulching grass clippings does not contribute to the buildup of thatch; proper mowing, irrigation and proper fertilization, and in particular, avoiding over-fertilization, will help keep thatch accumulation down. For more information, check out our top tips on Fall lawn...

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Best Way to Shovel Driveway this Winter

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Winterization | Comments Off on Best Way to Shovel Driveway this Winter

IMPORTANT NOTICE:  If you are inactive and have a history of heart trouble, talk to your doctor before you take on the task of shoveling snow. 1. The best way to shovel driveway starts by picking the right shovel.  A smaller blade will require you to lift less snow; putting less strain on your body.  2.  Dress in several layers so you can remove a layer as needed. It’ll be easier to move if your body is more warmed up than cold. 3.  Begin shoveling slowly to avoid placing a sudden demand on your heart. people have been known to strain themselves by going too hard right away.  Pace yourself and take breaks as needed! 4.  Protect your back from injury by lifting correctly; stand with your feet about hip width for balance and keep the shovel close to your body.  Bend from the  knees (not the back) and tighten your stomach muscles as you lift the snow.  Avoid twisting movements (if you need to move the snow to one side reposition your feet to face the direction the snow will be going). 5.  Most importantly — listen to your body.  Stop if you feel pain, we are just a phone call away. Rest assured that the best way to shovel driveway this Winter is by contacting Ultra Lawn for a free estimate. The Easy Alternative to Shoveling Snow: Now, if you don’t want to clear it yourself -or you don’t think you can- there’s one last alternative! Almost all neighborhoods have that one entrepreneurial kid who’ll do it for a few bucks. Another option is to simply ask a neighbor that might be willing to hep out. Whatever you decide to do , it’s best you don’t wait too long to get everything cleared up. If Winter hits hard and there’s no one around, rest assured Ultra Lawn can help you out....

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Smartest Snow Shoveling Tips for 2019

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Winterization | Comments Off on Smartest Snow Shoveling Tips for 2019

It happens every winter in this part of the country… snow falls, usually leaving piles of it to clear from your sidewalks and driveway. Why not think about the following snow shoveling tips before you grab your shovel after a major snowfall: Scooping up heavy piles of that snow is hard work for your back muscles. Impatience or overenthusiasm can cause you to pull a muscle or suffer from nagging backaches. Shoveling “pros” recommend that homeowners use curved shovels versus flat ones (they retain snow more effectively) and select a shovel that is of reasonable weight. Make sure that as you’re lifting your snow-filled shovel, you’re bending your knees. Don’t twist your back and toss the snow over your shoulder. That movement, when repeated continuously, will promote backaches. Ongoing research has shown an increase in the number of fatal heart attacks among snow shovelers after heavy snowfalls. This rise may be due to the sudden demand that shoveling places on an individual’s heart as snow shoveling may cause a quick increase in heart rate and blood pressure. One study determined that after only two minutes of shoveling, sedentary men’s’ heart rates rose to levels higher than those normally recommended during aerobic exercise. Shoveling can be made more difficult by the weather. Cold air makes it harder to work and breathe, which adds some extra strain on the body.  Additionally, there is the risk for hypothermia if one is not dressed correctly for the weather conditions. Who should think twice about our recommended snow shoveling tips? Anyone who has already had a heart attack. Individuals with a history of heart disease. Those with high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels. Smokers. Individuals leading a sedentary lifestyle. For more smart Winter tips, check out our Winterization...

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Smartest Snow Safety Tips for 2019

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 in Winterization | Comments Off on Smartest Snow Safety Tips for 2019

Winter is a time of year when hazards, both natural and man-made, can place you at risk in a moment of forgetfulness. Even you, the infallible homeowner — queen of the castle, king of the tool belt — may be taking risks of which you’re not even aware. That;s why we’ve put together the top snow safety tips for 2019! Beware of Black ice: You may have heard the term “black ice” to describe that near-invisible sheen covering your front step and walkway. “Black ice” is a poor term to describe something you can’t see until you slide and break a leg on it or even hit your head on a hard surface after taking a fall. Even worse, those spots place seniors at risk for very serious injury, including a broken hip. If you’re unsure about whether or not the sidewalk is slippery, walk slowly and cautiously with your feet pointing outward. This position actually helps you brace yourself better, and it helps protect you to some degree in the event that you slip and fall.  Also, proceed with caution when walking across your front yard; it may be frozen, which will cause you to slip and fall faster than you can say “ouch.” Here are some winterization tips that may help with slippery sidewalks! Top Snow safety Tips: The National Safety Council recommends taking the following precautions on potentially slippery surfaces: · Avoid wearing high-heeled shoes or boots outside. Instead, wear flat shoes with slip resistant soles or rain/snow boots; both of these provide you with some degree of traction. · As stated above, take short, flat steps. The heels and soles of your shoes keep contact with the ground as long as possible, providing you with maximum surface contact. · Before heading indoors, shake your umbrella outdoors; and once inside, remove your shoes. Snow and ice often stick to the soles of shoes and will melt almost immediately as your shoes begin to warm up. The result is a slippery surface and the risk of a...

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3 Questions To Ask Snow Removal Contractors

Posted by on Oct 9, 2012 in Snow Clearing, Winterization | Comments Off on 3 Questions To Ask Snow Removal Contractors

Asking the right questions to snow removal contractors can make a big difference. It can be the difference between elation and disaster for homeowners and business owners alike. Going with the ‘lowest bid’ hardly gets the job done anymore. It’s now time to consider the “price” verses the “value” of the service. Before contracting with your next snow plowing company, ask them these questions – and get verifiable answers that make sense. Does the company have insurance (General liability insurance specifically covering snow removal operations)? How long has the firm been operating? How will the company communicate with you & how will you be billed? Not all snow removal companies are created equal! We feel that if you ask snow removal contractors these questions, and diligently verify each of answer, you’ ll decide to do business with Ultra Lawn. Sound like a big statement? That’s because IT IS! Schedule a day for our experienced property maintenance estimator to come to your business/home. We’ll perform a complete and thorough estimate at no cost or obligation to you. In addition, our estimate will include everything necessary for you to make an informed and proper decision. Our estimators will work on your timeline, being available to stop by your business or home during the day, at night or on the weekends at your convenience. We’ll contact you within 24 hours once we receive your quote request. Additionally, feel free to call us at one of the numbers listed below for immediate assistance. Remember, our snow removal contractors are here for you. Thank you for the opportunity to serve you! Contact us today for a Free, No Obligation...

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Moisture Stress: What Does That Mean for Trees?

Posted by on Sep 5, 2012 in Lawn Care Tips | Comments Off on Moisture Stress: What Does That Mean for Trees?

With below average precipitation over several seasons, trees across Idaho becoming moisture stressed. Trees vary in their ability to tolerate this stress. In fact, native trees have much more tolerance than planted trees and shrubs. Moisture stressed trees are much more susceptible to diseases, insect attacks, and injury by severe weather. What is Moisture Stress? Basically, moisture stress occurs when the amount of water going out of a tree is greater than the amount going in. All plants transpire, loosing water through the foliage. This helps cool the plant and also move water from the roots to the leaves. When there is a shortage of water within the plant, foliage wilts. As this continues, symptoms such as browning of the leaf and needles occur. Deciduous trees and shrubs will drop some or all of their leaves. If a severe shortage occurs over a period of several years the death of the entire plant will occur. What Causes Moisture Stress? Stress from moisture continues to happen over the Winter. Most notably in evergreen trees and shrubs, when water evaporates from leaves and stems when the soil is cold or frozen. Roots extract little moisture from cold soils and none from frozen soils. Furthermore, roots cannot replace moisture lost. Trees and shrubs subjected to winter moisture stress will show browned needles. They might even possibly die over the Winter. This is commonly referred to as Winter death. Moisture stress related to dry soil can be alleviated by proper watering practices. Moisture stress is the primary cause of death for newly planted trees and shrubs, which need supplemental water every 7-10 days if there is not adequate rainfall. For all practical purposes, watering established trees and shrubs in times of drought will usually be restricted to those plants that are within distance of your longest hose. The Solution: It is very important that trees and shrubs receive enough water before the soil freezes. Most of a tree’s roots are located in the top two feet of soil. When watering, you want to soak the soil to a depth of at least 12 inches. Short, frequent watering usually does not penetrate much beyond the sod and organic matter layer of the soil profile. There are several methods of deep watering your trees. The easiest way is to spiral a soaker hose around your trees and shrubs let the hose run slowly for at least four hours. For more information, check out our Fall lawn care tips! Article By: Yvonne C....

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How To Prevent Snow Mold In Your Lawn

Posted by on Aug 28, 2012 in Lawn Care Tips, Spring Tips | Comments Off on How To Prevent Snow Mold In Your Lawn

Prevent Snow Mold in Your Lawn As winter is coming to an end, we long to see green grass again.  As the snow melts, you look out at your newly exposed lawn, to find grayish circles all over it. Gray snow mold loves the cold, and grows on your lawn when snow has been on the ground for an extended period of time. It will also grow under layers of leaves over the winter. Below are a few preventive tips so you can reduce the likelihood that your lawn will be attacked by this disease. Before It Snows Mow your Lawn Tall grass is a breeding ground for grey snow mold. You do not want to mow your grass down too short, but it does need to be cut it a little shorter than usual before the snow arrives, which can do a lot to prevent a snow mold problem. Rake or Mulch the Leaves A thick layer of leaves creates an environment for this  mold to grow in. In the fall, rake leaves up or use your lawnmower to mulch the fallen leaves into the lawn. Use Lawn care products with Low amounts Nitrogen Some lawn care products contain a lot of fast-release nitrogen to promote a quick green-up of your lawn. Nitrogen can promote the growth of grey mold caused from snow. Using a low-nitrogen, slow-release lawn food made for winter feeding. If Your Lawn Has Gray Snow Mold If the weather warms up after the snow melts the disease should go away on its own. If the temperatures stay around 30-40 degrees, the mold will continue to grow and make your lawn more diseased. Once the temperatures do warm up, rake out any dead grass and reseed patches as needed. Call...

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